Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPalermo F
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-25T09:12:25Z
dc.date.available2019-02-25T09:12:25Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-030-03468-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-03469-6_13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/8747
dc.description.abstractThe chapter argues that a significant amount of law has been developed over the past twenty years in order to constitutionalize secession. The legacy of the Canadian Quebec Secession Reference has been remarkable and has permeated, implicitly or explicitly, several legal systems, especially through their courts. However, the legal regulation of secessionist claims has so far been focusing almost exclusively on referendums, often not assisted by additional safeguards against plebiscitary (ab)use. At the same time, the legal regulation of political phenomena, which is the typical trend of constitutionalism, is clearly emerging with regard to secession too, and several instruments are being or can be employed to achieve a more effective, legally guaranteed and democratic comparative constitutional law of secession. Albeit sometimes unaware, these instruments are being developed. In its final session, the paper presents and discusses them.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishingen_US
dc.relation
dc.rights
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectSecession
dc.subjectConstitutionalism
dc.titleTowards a Comparative Constitutional Law of Secession?en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.date.updated2019-02-24T21:26:57Z
dc.publication.titleThe Canadian Contribution to a Comparative Law of Secession: Legacies of the Quebec Secession Reference
dc.language.isiEN-GB
dc.description.fulltextnoneen_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record