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dc.contributor.authorStopfner M
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-01T15:52:40Z
dc.date.available2018-10-01T15:52:40Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1569-2159
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1075/jlp.18014.sto
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/6290
dc.description.abstractHeckles are an illegitimate, yet common way of commenting directly and immediately on what is being said at the lectern. However, (non-)verbal interjections can also be used to disconcert the speaker, thus scoring points within the parliamentary arena. In these cases, female delegates are often confronted with discriminatory remarks and comments that border on sexism and even misogyny. Based on the extensive literature on gender and discourse, the following paper will focus on gender-related heckles and analyse argumentative structures and topoi that are grounded in sexist stereotypes and conservative role-models. Presuming that these incidents are not isolated instances, the paper will compare and contrast several examples from around the world that have caught public attention.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights
dc.titlePut your “big girl” voice on - Parliamentary heckling against female MPsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2018-10-01T15:51:19Z
dc.language.isiEN-GB
dc.journal.titleJournal of Language and Politics
dc.description.fulltextnoneen_US


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