Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIrsara M
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-29T09:01:47Z
dc.date.available2018-05-29T09:01:47Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2504-3900
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/proceedings1090928
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.mdpi.com/2504-3900/1/9/928
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/5086
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses the choices of English learners describing the opening scene of Mayer’s (1969) Frog, where are you? which depicts a frog escaping from a jar. A number of results were later tested using drawings that portray a person climbing. Speaking multiple languages might allow adjustment to ways of thinking, when formulating utterances and pointing to different details when describing pictures (Thinking for Speaking Hypothesis, Slobin 1996). The present paper contends that fewer contexts evoke mental images of climbing for speakers of Italian and Ladin who are learning English than for German-speaking English-learners, due to different cross-linguistic influences. en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution License
dc.titlePictures meet words: Learners of English describing motion situationsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.date.updated2018-05-15T13:06:08Z
dc.publication.titleProceedings of the International and Interdisciplinary Conference IMMAGINI? Image and Imagination between Representation, Communication, Education and Psychology
dc.language.isiEN-GB
dc.journal.titleProceedings
dc.description.fulltextopenen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record