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dc.contributor.authorKaland C
dc.contributor.authorGalatà V
dc.contributor.authorSpreafico L
dc.contributor.authorVietti A
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T13:15:18Z
dc.date.available2018-05-17T13:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0023-8309
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0023830917746551
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/4687
dc.description.abstractAcross languages of the world the /r/ sound is known for its variability. This variability has been investigated using articulatory models as well as in sociolinguistic studies. The current study investigates to what extent /r/ is a marker of a bilingual’s dominant language. To this end, a reading task was carried out by bilingual speakers from South Tyrol, who produce /r/ differently according to whether they dominantly speak Tyrolean or Italian. The recorded reading data were subsequently used in a perception experiment to investigate whether South Tyrolean bilingual listeners are able to identify the dominant language of the speaker. Results indicate that listeners use /r/ as a cue to determine the dominant language of the speaker whilst relying on articulatory distinctions between the variants. It is furthermore shown that /r/ correlates with three interdependent variables: the sociolinguistic background of the speakers, their speech production, and how their speech is perceived.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights
dc.titleWhich Language R You Speaking? /r/ as a Language Marker in Tyrolean and Italian Bilingualsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2018-05-15T12:33:10Z
dc.language.isiDE-DE
dc.journal.titleLanguage and Speech
dc.description.fulltextreserveden_US


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