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dc.contributor.authorMemili E
dc.contributor.authorFang H
dc.contributor.authorChrisman J
dc.contributor.authorDe Massis A
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date2017-04-21T00:00:00Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-16T15:09:04Z
dc.date.available2017-11-16T15:09:04Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0921-898X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11187-015-9670-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11187-015-9670-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/3916
dc.description.abstractDrawing on family business studies and the knowledge-based view of economic growth, we develop and test a model of how the prevalence of small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) under family control affects economic growth. Specifically, we propose there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between family SMEs’ proportional representation and economic growth owing to their relative strengths and limitations vis-à-vis non-family SMEs. Using state-level data from the US between 2004 and 2010, we find support for our hypothesis and the underlying contention that economic growth is maximized when an economy includes a balanced mix of family and non-family SMEs. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights
dc.subjectEconomic growthen_US
dc.subjectFamily firmsen_US
dc.subjectFamily businessen_US
dc.subjectSmall and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)en_US
dc.titleThe impact of small- and medium-sized family firms on economic growthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2017-07-31T10:14:52Z
dc.publication.title
dc.language.isiEN-GB
dc.journal.titleSmall Business Economics
dc.description.fulltextopenen_US


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