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dc.contributor.authorLorenz W
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T15:04:30Z
dc.date.available2017-11-15T15:04:30Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1369-1457
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691457.2017.1314938
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13691457.2017.1314938
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10863/3838
dc.description.abstractResponses to profound contemporary transformation processes are characterised by ‘situationalism’ as the expression of resignation in the face of overwhelming complexity. An over-emphasis on personal autonomy accompanied by a withdrawal to the seeming security of ‘given boundaries’ undermine programmes of social solidarity which had been a means of creating stability and social integration at national and European level. Social work’s origins as an academic discipline and as a profession reach back to the crisis phenomena that accompanied the early ‘project of modernity’ and the reflection on that history can help to identify a critical role of social work education in view of what could be described as the current crisis of modernity. A future vision of social work education centres on the conventional mandate of this profession to ‘make a critical difference’ with regard to deepening social divisions through rampant individualism as well as concerning trends to impose uniformity as a substitute for equality.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights
dc.titleSocial work education in Europe: towards 2025en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.updated2017-07-10T13:29:35Z
dc.publication.title
dc.language.isiEN-GB
dc.journal.titleEuropean Journal of Social Work
dc.description.fulltextreserveden_US


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